Elizabeth Newman Untitled (detail) 2019, oil on linen, 40 x 30cm. Image courtesy the artist, Damien Knight Gallery, Sydney, and Neon Parc, Melbourne.

Upcoming exhibition

Future exhibition

Future exhibitions

The Data Imaginary: Fears and Fantasies

1 July - 18 September 2021

The Data Imaginary: Fears and Fantasies is a groundbreaking project that brings together eminent and emerging artists and designers to show how creative applications of data technology are crucial for a vital, inclusive and sustainable future.

Image: Lola Greeno, Ceremonial green maireener shell necklace, 2018. 180cm long. Private collection, Sydney. Photo: Carl Warner.

Rebecca Belmore: Turbulent Water

25 March - 19 June 2021

Rebecca Belmore: Turbulent Water is the first solo Australian exhibition of major contemporary artist Rebecca Belmore. Co-curated by Wanda Nanibush and Angela Goddard, Turbulent Water will feature key video installations from her three decades of practice. Rebecca Belmore (1960) was born in Upsala and currently lives in Vancouver, Canada. Belmoreā€™s multidisciplinary works address social and political issues faced by Indigenous communities, and the connections between bodies, land and language.

Image: Rebecca Belmore Fountain 2005, single-channel video with sound projected onto falling water, 2m25s, 274 x 488cm (overall dimensions variable). Collection: Art Gallery of Ontario, Toronto. Courtesy the artist.

Elizabeth Newman: Is that a ‘No’?

8 September - 21 November 2020

Elizabeth Newman: Is that a ‘No'? surveys 30 years of the career of Australian artist Elizabeth Newman.

Formal structures in the work of Melbourne-based artist Elizabeth Newman (b.1962) resonate and repeat.

Newman's paintings, cut-fabric pieces, collages, sculptures and constructions engage with voids and frames, offering encounters between words and wordlessness.

This selection spans 30 years, from 1989-2019, and focuses on the way in which negations, disavowals, excisions and certain articulations of space can function throughout art as a type of existential thinking.

Newman's creative and linguistic acts include a questioning attitude to art, as well as to the unconscious, which is unruly, which manifests, and finds meaning and likewise a lack of meaning.

Elizabeth Newman Untitled 2016. Oil and tape on linen, 100 x 80cm.
Courtesy the artist, Darren Knight Gallery, Sydney, and Neon Parc, Melbourne

The Data Imaginary: Fears and Fantasies

July - September 2021

The Data Imaginary: Fears and Fantasies is a groundbreaking project that brings together eminent and emerging artists and designers to show how creative applications of data technology are crucial for a vital, inclusive and sustainable future.

Managing and presenting data are central concerns in our contemporary lives. Comprising an exhibition and publication, the project will provide a unique platform for audiences to explore data both critically and playfully. The audience will also be empowered to respond to climate change patterns and future city design, interact with empathy from remote locations, learn about Indigenous cultural knowledges and reflect on everyday habits that secure data privacy.

In the era of rapid global warming, privacy corruption and fake news, the relevance of critical and creative engagements with data could not be any more crucial than they are now. Unless the catastrophes of climate change, online surveillance, and debased historical legacies are attended to urgently the rights of the living (animals, plants and humans) will be only exponentially eroded.

The exhibition will include artworks and designs that engage audiences in critical, playful and agentic reflections on data and creative technologies.

Due to COVID-19, the exhibition has been postponed until 2021. To collaboratively develop the curation of the Data Imaginary with the public and debate how our changing engagements with data are evolving, the exhibition will be developed in a series of online events.

Lola Greeno Ceremonial green maireener shell necklace, 2018. 180cm long.
Private collection, Sydney. Photo: Carl Warner.