Below is a summary of recent publications by researchers from the Griffith Institute for Tourism.

Tourism as a trade tool

Can Tourism be a Policy Tool to Moderate Trade Balance?

Dr Xin (Cathy) Jin and researchers from Sun Yat-sen University published an article titled 'Can tourism be a policy tool to moderate trade balance?' in the Annals of Tourism Research journal.

The trade war between the United States and China has been escalated due to economic, social and political factors lately. Dr Xin (Cathy) Jin and researchers from Sun Yat-sen University discuss the capacity and impact of international tourism as a policy tool to moderate trade balance.

The article is timely and important, given that the geo-strategic competition and economic rivalry are likely to persist post-COVID-19.

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Climate change

Tourism and Climate Change: Evaluating the Extent of Policy Integration

Professor Susanne Becken, Dr Emma Whittlesea, Johanna Loehr and Professor Daniel Scott recently published an article titled 'Tourism and climate change: evaluating the extent of policy integration' in the Journal of Sustainable Tourism.

This research developed a framework to assess policy integration between the tourism and climate change domains by examining coverage, scope, materiality and alignment.

The paper concludes with some minimum expectations for policy integration, including examples of good practice, and suggests that more effort is required to achieve climate change policy integration in tourism.

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China

Carbon Price Impacts on the Chinese Tourism Industry

Associate Professor Tien Pham, Dr Samual Meng and a team of researchers published an article on 'Carbon Price Impacts on the Chinese Tourism Industry' in the Journal of Travel Research.

This study simulates the short-run effects of an Emissions Trading Scheme (ETS) and two auxiliary policies on the Chinese tourism industry. The results show that the ETS alone will increases energy prices and have significant adverse impacts on China’s economy. The adverse impacts are relatively stronger on the energy sectors than they are on tourism. Two auxiliary policies—a tourism subsidy and a reduced goods and services tax (GST)—are examined as policy options to soften the negative impacts of the ETS. Results show that the tourism-subsidy policy is more effective than the GST reduction policy.

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Stakeholder engagement

Understanding the contribution of stakeholder collaboration towards regional destination branding

Rachel Perkins working with Associate Professor Catheryn Khoo-Lattimore and Professor Charles Arcodia published an article titled 'Understanding the contribution of stakeholder collaboration towards regional destination branding: A systematic narrative literature review' in the Journal of Hospitality and Tourism Management.

This research investigates the complexities of destination branding for small tourism businesses in regional areas, revealing the challenges faced by these destinations in attracting sustained tourism. The research highlights how useful collaboration has proven to be in regional destination branding, but also reveals how difficult and problematic enacting collaboration can be in practice.

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Hotel

Managers' leadership, compensation and benefits, and departments’ performance: Evidence from upscale hotels in Australia

Dr Ying Wang and Adjust Associate Professor Anoop Patiar published an article on 'Managers' leadership, compensation and benefits, and departments’ performance: Evidence from upscale hotels in Australia' in the Journal of Hospitality and Tourism Management.

As hotels strive to improve their management practices, managers' leadership style has been recognised for its influence on hotel departments' performance.

The study investigates the role of compensation and benefits in the relationship between leadership style and hotel performance at the department level. The findings help clarify the mechanisms underlying how leadership works to improve performance and highlight the importance of well-designed compensation and benefits systems in hotels.

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Social media use and athletes

An exploration of the distractions inherent to social media use among athletes

Dr Michelle Hayes, Associate Professor Kevin Filo, Dr Caroline Riot and Andrea Geurin published an article on 'An exploration of the distractions inherent to social media use among athletes' in the Sports Management Review journal.

Social media present athletes with a number of benefits and challenges. As a result, various sport stakeholders have debated appropriate social media use among athletes at major sport events, with some suggesting that using these platforms can have negative consequences.

The purpose of this research was to examine the elements of social media that athletes perceive to be distracting during major sport events and the practices they undertake to address such distractions. Opportunities for sport practitioners to develop or implement social media education programs are described.

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