ADVOCACY

Advocacy: Public support for an idea, plan, or way of doing something.

You will cover the following for the Advocacy capability:

Descriptor 1: Equity and Human Rights

Descriptor 2: Leadership, Advocacy and Effecting Change

Descriptor 1: Equity and Human Rights

Introduction

The United Nations Resolution 61/295 Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples adopted by the General Assembly 107th plenary meeting 13 September 2007.

This module is about equity, human rights and leadership. You will continue your lifelong journey towards cultural capability by being able to recognise that the whole health system is responsible for improving Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health and that advocating for equitable outcomes and social justice for Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander peoples actively contributes to social change.

This descriptor develops understanding of equity, human rights and leadership. To analyse how the health system is responsible for improving Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander Peoples health including how health professionals can advocate for equitable outcomes and social justice for Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait islander peoples and actively

Learning Outcome

Upon the completion of this topic you should be able to:

  • gain an initial understanding of Human Rights and their relationships to social justice; and
  • identify possible strategies to interpret inequity in health care for First Peoples.

Social Justice and Human Rights

Social justice and human rights are about making sure that every Australian has a choice about how they live and the means to make those choices (Human Rights and Equal Opportunity Commission, 2003).

What do social justice and human rights look like?

These are two distinct but related concepts. The latter is often ‘measured’ by the former. The latter are developed by the UN, the former are ways governments achieve those human rights.

  1. Waking up in a house with running water and proper sanitation;
  2. Ensuring children receive an education that helps them develop their potential and respect their culture;
  3. Having satisfying employment and good health (Human Rights and Equal Opportunity Commission, 2003).

The United Nations also recognises the distinctive rights of First Peoples of this land and its Declaration of Indigenous Rights. These include:

  1. The right to a distinct status and culture, which helps maintain and strengthen the identity, spiritual and cultural practices of First Peoples communities;
  2. The right to self-determination, which is a process where First Peoples communities take control of their future and decide how they will address the issues facing them; and
  3. The right to land, which provides the spiritual and cultural basis of First Peoples communities (Human Rights and Equal Opportunity Commission, 2003)

Inequality vs Inequity

The World Health Organisation defines health inequalities as the “difference in health status or in the distribution of health determinants between different population groups” (WHO, 2016) and recognises that some of the determinants of health are “unnecessary and avoidable as well as unjust and unfair, so that the resulting health inequalities also lead to inequity in health” (WHO, 2016).  The concept of ‘unfairness’ is central to understanding ‘inequity’ as it relates to groups such as First Peoples who are especially socially disadvantaged, for example, through racism and discrimination that hinders access to opportunities to pursue health (Taylor & Guerin, 2014).

Equality

Is about SAMENESS. It promotes fairness and justice by giving everyone the same thing BUT it can only work if everyone starts from the SAME place.

Equity

Is about FAIRNESS. It is about making sure people get access to the same opportunities.  Sometimes our differences and/or history, can create barriers to participation and so we must first ensure EQUITY before we can enjoy EQUALITY.

Descriptor 2: Leadership, Advocacy and Effecting Change

Introduction

Advocacy: Recognise that the whole health system is responsible for improving Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health. Advocate for equitable outcomes and social justice for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Peoples and actively contribute to social change.

This descriptor introduces students to the representative health professional organisations that advocate for change and promote better health and wellbeing of Australia’s First Peoples. Recognise that the whole health system is responsible for improving Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health. Advocate for equitable outcomes and social justice for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples and actively contribute to social change.

Learning Outcome

Upon the completion of this topic you should be able to identify professional leadership bodies that can assist you in addressing challenges in culturally safe health care within the health system.

Content

Below are the various health professional organisations that advocate for change and promote better health for Australia’s First Peoples.Watch the video for the National Congress of Australia's First Peoples and then view the video for the Close The Gap campaign decade in review.

Close The Gap Campaign

Close the Gap is a social justice campaign that aims to achieve health equality (measured as life expectancy equality) for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people by 2030 (Holland, C. 2016).

Learn more about Close The Gap

Close The Gap Day 2020

Close The Gap - A Decade in Review

Close The Gap Report 2019

Yuwahn-Gulgan Study

At the beginning of your Yuwahn Wupin learning journey you were asked to contribute to the Yuwahn-Gulgan Study. Gifted form the Yugambeh language Peoples this short title for the study means "cultural-safety".

The Yuwahn-Gulgan Study aims to evaluate the effectiveness of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health and cultural safety education and training.

If you did complete the pre-learning survey we would greatly appreciate your contribution to the research by also completing the post-learning survey. This survey will take approximately 15-20 minutes to complete.

Yuwahn-Gulgan post-learning survey