Establishing Research Trajectories

The Branding and Consumer Research Network is engaged in numerous projects covering a diverse range of branding and consumer research topics.  Take a look at some of our current and ongoing projects.

Projects

Brand Fidelity Project

The brand fidelity project involves an ongoing series of studies to further validate the brand fidelity scale developed by Professor Debra Grace, Dr Mitchell Ross (Griffith University) and Associate Professor Ceridwyn King (Temple University, Philadelphia). The ultimate goal of this research is to merge the brand fidelity measure within a suite of other consumer satisfaction indicators to develop a computer program or application. Such a program/app will enable businesses to conduct their own market research and, in doing so, have immediate access to meaningful results and strategic recommendations.

Personal Brand Project

The personal brand project is led by Dr Cassandra France (The University of Queensland) and is exploring the current state of knowledge around the role of personal brands in corporate success. In particular, the project analyses established literature to identify key themes and trends emerging for application to individual personal brand strategies. The ultimate goal of the research is to better understand how individuals and organisations can manage personal brand strategies for success.

Effect of the Royal Commission on Bank Reputations

In association with Griffith University and Prof Rob Palmatier of University of Washington, Adjunct Associate Professor Karl Treacher, of The Brand Institute, is undertaking empirical research relating to the reputational challenges and journeys of the big four Australian banks through the Royal Commission period of 2018.

Australian Silo Art Project

Spanning rural, regional and remote areas, Australia’s evolving silo art phenomenon opens up pathways for strengthening local communities, reinforcing place identities, stimulating tourism that respects the former vital processes and encouraging authentic place brands. The unique cultural, institutional, digital and socio-historical dynamics of this phenomenon present opportunities to further examine multiple interplays pertinent to creative placemaking (e.g. resident/tourist, bottom-up/top-down influences, past/present/future). This project also directs particular attention to the roles of user-generated media and civic-minded creative community members in capacitating and continually energising street art as creative placemaking outside Australia’s major cities. Dr Amelia Green will present insights gained thus far at an international creative placemaking event for planners, local authorities, architects and other place stakeholders in Denmark later this year.

Customer Rage Project

Customer rage project involves several studies aiming to understand what drive customers' extreme negative emotions (e.g, rage, extreme anger) following service failures and examine customer coping  strategies during rage incidents. The project is a collaborative work of Dr Jiraporn Surachartkumtonkun (Griffith University), Prof Paul Patterson (University of New South Wales), and Prof Janet McColl-Kennedy (University of Queensland)

Customer Online Complaint Project

The aim of this project is to investigate the impact of an online complaint, specifically the tone of the language and the explanation content, on third-party customers who read the online reviews before making purchase decisions. This project is initiated by Dr Jiraporn Surachartkumtonkun (Griffith University), Prof Debra Grace (Griffith University) and Dr Mitchell Ross (Griffith University).

End of Life Care Discharge Project

As part of the Queensland Health End of Life Care Strategy, Gold Coast Health is developing a process to support discharge for people near end of life who would like to die at home. A Productivity Commission Report in 2017 noted that although over 70% of Australians prefer to die at home, less than 10% do. This is attributed to the need for improvement in the transition between hospital and community care.  The outcomes of this study are expected to include: (1) an evidence-based discharge process and infrastructure to enhance the transition from hospital [medical wards] to home for end of life care; (2) end of life care information brochure for patients and their family carers; (3) stakeholder feedback to indicate that the process is feasible and satisfactory; and (4) a health service and non-government organisational partnership network to monitor the discharge process and enhance future integrated models of end of life care. Dr Joan Carlini collaborates with numerous researchers on this project.

Business and the 2018 Gold Coast Commonwealth Game

Mega-sporting events (MSEs) can have significant impacts and legacies on local communities, i.e. better roads, improved public facilities and transport (for example, the Gold Coast Light Rail), and a positive spike in tourism, but the hype and media attention they bring can also lead to overstated expectations around increased business demand, and have an inverse effect on local business when they are faced with boosted security, changed consumer behaviours of locals, and displaced leisure tourists making way for the event. Unearthing the best organisational practices behind running mega-sporting events so their impacts for businesses and legacies for the community are improved, is a key interest for Dr Joan Carlini, Department of Marketing, and Professor Andrew O’Neill,  Dean Research from the Business School.

Queensland Wine Tourism

This project is intended to explore both international and domestic tourists to grow wine tourism visitation. As this project is Queensland specific, it will focus on evaluating consumer’s perceptions of wine regions in Queensland. This project will ensure the outcomes are developed to assist Queensland wine tourism operators which are considered an emerging market in Queensland. Through this analysis, we will identify and build experiences which tourists are seeking. Dr Joan Carlini leads a team of researchers on this project.

Luxury Brands Project

This research proposes a theoretical framework integrating functional theories of attitudes and consumer motivations in the context of luxury consumption. Initiated by Dr Wei Shao, Dr Mitchell Ross and Professor Debra Grace, this research offers a unique perspective into the investigation of brand visibility in luxury consumption. As such, this research contributes to the literature through the introduction and testing of moderating variables demonstrating that consumer preference for brand visibility is driven not only by consumer motivation but also by the perceived social function of luxury consumption.

Customer Experience and Engagement:

A Longitudinal Study.

Mojtaba Barari is a PhD student  supervised by Dr Jiraporn Surachartkumtonkun and Dr Mitchell Ross. Mojtba’s research is focused around the sharing economy.  Adopting a longitudinal approach, his research investigates the relationship between customer experience and engagement.

Exploring Social and Cultural Meaning

of Chinese Luxury Brands.

Ting Jin is a PhD student supervised by Dr Wei Shao, Dr Mitchell Ross and Prof. Debra Grace. The aim of her research is to explore social and cultural meanings of Chinese luxury brand, addressing a gap in the literature that mainly focuses on wealth and social status for luxury branding. China has shown an increasing demand for luxury in the global market; however, little is known regarding Chinese consumers’ perceptions of domestic luxury brands. This research brings a Chinese perspective on luxury consumption and highlights the uniqueness of Chinese luxury brands.

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Past projects

Brand Fidelity Project

The brand fidelity project involves an ongoing series of studies to further validate the brand fidelity scale developed by Professor Debra Grace, Dr Mitchell Ross (Griffith University) and Associate Professor Ceridwyn King (Temple University, Philadelphia). The ultimate goal of this research is to merge the brand fidelity measure within a suite of other consumer satisfaction indicators to develop a computer program or application. Such a program/app will enable businesses to conduct their own market research and, in doing so, have immediate access to meaningful results and strategic recommendations.

Personal Brand Project

The personal brand project is led by Dr Cassandra France (The University of Queensland) and is exploring the current state of knowledge around the role of personal brands in corporate success. In particular, the project analyses established literature to identify key themes and trends emerging for application to individual personal brand strategies. The ultimate goal of the research is to better understand how individuals and organisations can manage personal brand strategies for success.

Effect of the Royal Commission on Bank Reputations

In association with Griffith University and Prof Rob Palmatier of University of Washington, Adjunct Associate Professor Karl Treacher, of The Brand Institute, is undertaking empirical research relating to the reputational challenges and journeys of the big four Australian banks through the Royal Commission period of 2018.

Australian Silo Art Project

Spanning rural, regional and remote areas, Australia’s evolving silo art phenomenon opens up pathways for strengthening local communities, reinforcing place identities, stimulating tourism that respects the former vital processes and encouraging authentic place brands. The unique cultural, institutional, digital and socio-historical dynamics of this phenomenon present opportunities to further examine multiple interplays pertinent to creative placemaking (e.g. resident/tourist, bottom-up/top-down influences, past/present/future). This project also directs particular attention to the roles of user-generated media and civic-minded creative community members in capacitating and continually energising street art as creative placemaking outside Australia’s major cities. Dr Amelia Green will present insights gained thus far at an international creative placemaking event for planners, local authorities, architects and other place stakeholders in Denmark later this year.