Solving complex challenges with world-class research

Contemporary societies face important challenges to safety, justice and equity that criminological knowledge can help solve. Our research focuses on five key challenges:

Recent projects

ENGAGING MUSLIMS IN THE FIGHT AGAINST TERRORISM

Professor Tina Murphy is the recipient of an ARC Future Fellowship, for her project 'Engaging Muslims in the Fight Against Terrorism: Is procedural justice policing a crucial piece of the puzzle?'. This project critically examines the value of ‘procedural justice’ in community-based counterterrorism policing. ‘Procedural justice’ reflects whether people are treated with respect and fairness, are given voice in decision making, and are dealt with in an impartial manner by authorities. Professor Murphy's previous research has identified procedural justice as important for engaging minority communities, and procedural justice has also been found to be important in community-based counter-terrorism policing. This project specifically examines when procedural justice policing is most likely to promote Muslims’ trust in police and their willingness to report terror threats to police. Importantly, it also explores if and when police are willing to use procedural justice in counter-terrorism policing,

THE ROAD TO COMPLIANCE: INTEGRATING THREE THEORIES

Dr Lyndel Bates is the recipient of a Discovery Early Career Researcher Award (DECRA) for her project 'The road to compliance: Integrating three theories'. This project aims to reduce young driver deaths and injuries by developing an integrated theory of road policing using the elements of deterrence, procedural justice and third party policing approaches. The expected outcome of this project is an integrated theory of road policing that can be used to better inform interventions for young driver compliance. This should provide significant benefits including a reduction in crashes and offences by young drivers.

CRIME PREVENTION AND COUNTER-TERRORISM

Dr Keiran Hardy is currently undertaking a two-year Griffith University Postdoctoral Fellowship entitled 'Crime prevention and counter-terrorism: Understanding countering violent extremism programs and their relationship with the criminal law'. In this project, Dr Hardy is comparing government strategies for countering violent extremism and radicalisation in Australia, the United Kingdom, Germany, Denmark, and other countries in Western Europe and Scandinavia. He is also examining how criminological theories and methods can help to understand the radicalisation process.

FROM OUTSIDER TO PARTICIPANT: TRANSFORMING THE ROLE OF VICTIMS IN CRIMINAL JUSTICE

Dr Robyn Holder is currently undertaking a two-year Griffith University Postdoctoral Fellowship entitled 'From outsider to participant: transforming the role of victims in criminal justice'. This project re-positions crime victims as citizens with interests that are independent of the state and prosecution. It explores how criminal justice might be transformed into a three-party structure that includes victims’ interests. The project is examining how victim advocacy has shaped international criminal tribunals as systems of hybrid law and how these developments might influence domestic criminal justice.

MAJOR RESEARCH PROJECTS

Our major research projects are diverse and lead the way in helping define contemporary criminological discourse.

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