GAI’s Research Papers / Monographs aim to increase the accessibility of our research to the broader community, including media, government and interested public. Explore in depth our world-class, policy-relevant research on Australia and its regional environment.

DEATH OF A HERO: THE U THANT DISTURBANCES IN BURMA, DECEMBER 1974

The widespread anti-government demonstrations in Burma before the army re-exerted its control on 18 September 1988 constituted the worst outbreak of domestic political violence since the 1962 military coup, in which General Ne Win seized power. The only other time that the government had been forced to declare martial law was in 1974, when students and Buddhist monks abducted the body of the former United Nations Secretary-General, U Thant.

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RULE OF LAW WITHOUT DEMOCRATIZATION: CAMBODIA AND SINGAPORE IN COMPARATIVE PERSPECTIVE

The rule of law in Singapore has been criticised by liberal democrats for its illiberal nature yet it remains an attractive model for some newly developing countries, including Cambodia, that aspire to achieve economic development without liberal democracy. This paper traces the recent convergence of the rule of law in Singapore and Cambodia in the face of each country’s political, historical, and social differences, and the obstacles confronting Cambodia’s judicial and legal reform.

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AUSTRALIA AND THE REPUBLIC OF KOREA: STILL ALLIES OR JUST GOOD FRIENDS?

Australia’s participation in the Korean War of 1950–53 had more to do with domestic factors and wider international considerations, than with any feelings of affinity with the Korean people. Circumstances have greatly changed since then, but some remnants of that military involvement still survive in the form of the United Nations Command (UNC) and the Sixteen Nations Declaration of 1953. While tensions between the Republic of Korea (ROK) and the Democratic People’s Republic of Korea (DPRK) remain high, the possibility of the UNC becoming involved in a fresh outbreak of hostilities will always remain.

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